Omega to the Ranchers by Stephen Hoppa

Omega to the Ranchers Book Cover

Title: Omega to the Ranchers
Author: Stephen Hoppa
Genre:  M/M Paranormal Erotica
Format:  Novella (115 p.)
SitesGoodreads | Amazon
Series: Becoming Omega #1
Publisher: Amazon (Oct. 2015)
AISN: B017EKHM9K

2.5 stars (out of 5)

Tagline: Abused human omega rescued and respected by Alpha and Beta werewolves (Alpha/omega ménage erotic story)

I received a free, epub copy of this story in exchange for an honest review.

A brief, novella-length story of an abused, straight, and human omega taken in by two hunky werewolves, including the pack Alpha and his caring but tough Beta mate.  The plot follows their somewhat careful move towards a “triad” ménage relationship navigating through the vicissitudes of pack politics, personal histories of abuse, and fears of the omega simply being used.  Includes explicit scenes of first-time with men, voyeurism, lightish Domination/submission, and fully threeway ménage.

I read this twice, and the first go through was somewhat enjoyable, while a second, closer reading was less compelling.  This came across a simplistic, easy to read, but occasionally eye-rolling quick jaunt through erotic and/or romantic themes I enjoy, including werewolf pack dynamics (especially involving omegas),  fully “triad” ménage relationships, and a rescue from abuse theme.  While I did not find the story to be particularly compelling, it worked o.k. as a diversionary, escapist read with a little Alpha/Beta/Omega werewolf sizzle.

I agree with other reviewers who have indicated this fits nicely into the “Stormy Glenn” category of m/m erotic romance, where explicit stories have enough plot to be separated from pure erotica/smut, but with writing that has plenty of cheesy, simplistic, and sometimes eye-rolling passages.  In other words, this works for a basic, somewhat heated werewolf ménage read rather than a compelling romantic/erotic story.

Positive moments included a chuckle for the phrase “werewolf-sexual” (as opposed to bisexual or homosexual) to explain the (human) omega’s sudden attraction to two strong (werewolf) males, highlighting a subdued form of the “instant mate” trope.   Also, there were repeated, decent character actions regarding the slightly contrasting roles the Alpha and Beta played for the Omega.

While Eric’s touch said, “I own you,” Tyler’s said, “I’m going to take care of you.”

Overall rating:  It was o.k. for a short, explicit werewolf ménage escape – 2.5 stars.   Therefore, following the general “star” meaning indicators,  rounded down to  2 stars (“o.k.”) in Goodreads, and up to 3 stars (“o.k.”) in Amazon.

 

Examples of problematic moments:

Unconcerned alpha: The pack alpha, Eric, doesn’t have an omega to ground him, so members of his pack are turning “feral” (which seems like a fate close to death, if not worse), three alone within that last few weeks.  Instead of discussing this issue at a pack meeting, Eric dismisses it and starts talking about the improvement in pack finances (much to the dismay of the pack members).

Missing poster: Apparently an abusive, cop father distributed a large number of MISSING posters after he severely beat his 19 year-old kid (almost to death?) and left him to probably die.  It just didn’t make sense – perhaps he was trying to cover-up his abuse, in case people asked what happened to his (adult) son and/or if the victim’s body suddenly turned up?

Feel of the ranch: At one time, the omega exclaims “The entire property with the ranch probably cost millions. Or fuck, I dunno, billions?”  During the rest of the story, the pack’s ranch came across as more of a struggling concern (or at least all of the pack members were very hard working and the finances/margins didn’t seem particularly great).  So either the “millions/billions” statement was supposed to indicate the new, human omega was clueless when it came to real-world finances (billions?), or the feel the author was trying to convey was inconsistent.  (In the rest of the book, it came across a semi-struggling concern where the Alpha had to put in plenty of hard work, versus a more comfortable, CEO type of role.)  This is just an example of how the writing did not come across as particularly compelling, detailed or believable.  (And yes, I realize if one is focused on the erotic aspects, those details don’t matter much, but overall this type of writing undermined any greater pull beyond the erotic heat from the broader story.)

Sudden, rough-ish, rather Dominant/submissive sex: 

On the one hand, the Alpha and Beta were extraordinarily and repeatedly concerned about the Omega making a choice to be with them out of his own free will and not feel forced, even though continued delay in their formal claiming was endangering the lives of individual pack members.  On the other, the pair has no problems quickly leading the virginal, abused omega into rough-ish (“fuck my face”) submissive sex, and basically using him in a tit-for-tat sex game.  Again, while this is not necessarily out of place in an erotic story meant to be enjoyed for semi-kinky heat, but gives the surrounding story an unbelievable (or at least inconsistent) feel.

“He jerked my head back and forced it back down, using me so hard and rough, I could hardly take it, but I wanted it so fucking bad that I was moaning around his delicious skin.”

“Then he grabbed me by the hair, jerked me to my feet, and thrust me up against a fence post. His hand came down hard against my ass cheek. The ringing smack sent trembles of need through my body.

“You’re going to get it hard for that.”

“Please, please fuck my face.”

 

“But I want you to get this. It wasn’t that you dominated me that made me feel weird. It was that I felt like I was being used in a game. I felt like, like I was on the outside of your relationship”

 

“Or no, maybe they just wanted to see me on my knees, choking on their cocks as the dominated me. That thought alone was so hot, I could almost cum all over again.”

“Oh yeah, take it like an omega.”

Wettened:  A quote from the book: “Tyler’s wettened hands…”  Technically, this is a grammatically correct usage of the past participle of the word wetten as an adjective, but it’s an extraordinarily uncommon usage (and, to my mind, rather awkward construction) in current English.  I don’t know whether to be impressed by such a surprise, or bothered by how it awkward it sounded to me.  I wondered if it were a regional usage (the author used the word centre, so I thought he might be British or Australian).  The extraordinarily little usage of this word I could find was scattered across only a three dozen articles in British, Australian, Canadian and American newspapers. (Only thirty eight uses of the word found in five billion documents in LexisNexis, and similar results in other news, business, and academic databases.)

 

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A Male Writer’s Take on Women writing MM Romance

I am posting a link to an interesting post from a gay male author of MM romance regarding the occasional (but seemingly recurrent) concerns regarding women authors (and readers) dominating the genre. While I am sympathetic with some of the points raised by critics, I overall greatly appreciate the community and the efforts of all authors to present romantic (and often heated) stories that I can identify with and greatly enjoy. This blog post reflects much of my own feelings on the issue (as I am a male reader of MM romance).

Jamie Fessenden's Blog

SterekThe argument has surfaced again and again over the four years since I first published in this genre:  Are women really capable of writing MM Romance?  After all, it’s about men.  Shouldn’t men write it?

My answer to those questions is a bit complex, so bear with me.

First, a little history.  This is based upon my personal experience, supplemented by some cursory research, so don’t take anything I say as absolute fact.  I would love to see someone do a really thorough history of the genre someday.

I don’t know how old modern “gay literature” is.  I do know E.M. Forster wrote Maurice in 1913 (though it wasn’t published until after his death in 1971).  Blair Niles published a novel in 1931 called Strange Brother, which tells of the friendship between a heterosexual woman and a gay man.   Authors such as Christopher Isherwood and Langston Hughes…

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